"As the days went on, you see more and more people tweeting about it." As of Wednesday, the slogan #BringBackOurGirls has been tweeted more than 1.3 million times

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NEW YORK - The Ursuline School color is blue, but many of the students at the all-girls school in suburban New Rochelle wore red on Wednesday. "We're not in Nigeria with them, but we're marching too!" said one student. The girls at the Ursuline School say they learned about the mass kidnapping on Twitter. The abduction occurred on April 15, but the story did not gain traction online until April 23, https://www.zrccb1jea.online/ when two Nigerians tweeted, "#BringBackOurDaughters." More in Nigeria In Turmoil Within days, a new slogan -- #BringBackOurGirls -- was being shared around the world. Activists and celebrities posted online demands for action, including singer Mary J. Blige and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. By Tuesday, #BringBackOurGirls had been tweeted a million times. New York University professor Beth Noveck follows social media's impact on government. "What this has done is brought it to popular attention by using essentially a bumper sticker, a hashtag that gets people talking, that gets people sharing the idea with one another," she said. Veronique Ntumba is about to graduate. Would she have known about the mass abduction if not for social media? "Probably not, which is really sad," she said. "As the days went on, you see more and more people tweeting about it." As of Wednesday, the slogan #BringBackOurGirls has been tweeted more than 1.3 million times. What really seemed to hit home for the Ursuline students was that the kidnap victims are their own age.

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